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PROFESSIONAL SOTAI ASSOCIATION

Welcome to the web page of the PSA, the Professional Sotai Association, a not-for profit

organisation for sotai professionals and students.

 

Our aim is to promote and further the study, use and training of professionals

in the complementary health therapy called Sotai or Sotai Ho.

The art of painless relief

Sotai or Sotai Ho is a form of muscular or movement therapy of Japanese origin created by Dr. Keizo

Hashimoto, a Japanese medical surgeon (1897–1993).

Through his knowledge of Oriental and Western medicine he developed a model of treatment that was

based on returning natural body alignment by moving joints in a comfortable way rather than adjusting

towards pain.

Sotai Therapy provides a method for neuromuscular re-education and promotes healing in the

circulatory, nervous and endocrine systems by untwisting muscular holding patterns.

Sotai exercises increase mobility, flexibility and reduce or eliminate pain as found in back problems,

torticollis, scoliosis, ankle or knee sprains, etc.

 

Sotai Ho is a systematic form of exercise using active and passive exercises to correct imbalances in

the structural integrity of the body. The goal is to see where one’s body is out of alignment and to

practise specific exercises to alleviate each disorder.

The exercises and techniques are very gentle, equalise muscle tone and can correct postural

imbalance.

The aim of a Sotai treatment is to eliminate pain, line up bones when they are misaligned and release

muscular stiffness or pain anywhere in the body.

The two main principles behind Sotai are:

1) Follow the line of least resistance. If you have difficulty, or it is painful to move

a muscle to the left, then you should do the exercise in the other direction, away from discomfort,

pain or stiffness.

These stretches in only one direction (i.e. only to the right, or only to the left), the direction in which

the movement doesn't hurt, or feels the most comfortable, lead to principle number

2) NO PAIN.

Following these two principles gives us the most important characteristic of Sotai: we can alleviate,

reduce or eliminate muscular pain with exercises that are not painful.

“To treat a patient for an illness without correcting distortion in their frame is like bailing water

with a bottomless bucket.” – Keizo Hashimoto